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BLM advances renewable energy development in Utah solar energy zone

Jennifer Dickson

The Bureau of Land Management is moving ahead with plans to lease public lands in the Milford Flats South Solar Energy Zone, a low-conflict zone for solar development w

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Interior Department takes shameful step towards Arctic Refuge drilling

Today it submitted a notice of intent to begin an environmental scoping on a proposed lease sale that could be held as early as next year.

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Legislation introduced by Senator Bennet focuses on lands in Southwestern Colorado

Jennifer Dickson

The legislation would secure protections for nearly 60,000 acres in the heart of the San Juan Mountains. Half of the acreage would expand or create wilderness for the Mt. Sneffels Range, Lizard Head area and McKenna Peak.

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Memo: House farm bill forestry title potentially disastrous for national forests

Anastasia Greene

The bill was introduced by Republican members of the House Agriculture Committee on April 12 and was approved, without amendments, by the Committee in a party-line vote on April 18. 

Background

Clean energy boom played key role in recent US carbon emissions drop, study shows

Wind, solar and other clean energy development held their own against natural gas, accounting for nearly one-third of the emissions reduction 2007-2013.

     

How environmental innovation will transform business as usual

Google, Walmart and other leading companies are investing in innovations that empower people to take action.

     

Welcome to the Fourth Wave: A new era of environmental progress

It will empower people and fundamentally transform how we solve environmental problems.

     

Winter Sports Under Threat in a Changing Climate

Winter Sports Under Threat from Climate Change

640px-2010_Winter_Olympic_-_Womens_downhill_medals

Adapted from a report by Protect Our Winters

In mountain towns across the United States that rely on winter tourism, snow is currency. For snow lovers and the winter sports industry, predictions of a future with warmer winters, reduced snowfall, and shorter snow seasons is inspiring them to innovate, increase their own efforts to address emissions, and speak publicly on the urgent need for action.

A new report, The Economic Contributions of Winter Sports in a Changing Climate examines the economic contribution of winter snow sports tourism to US national and state-level economies. In a 2012 analysis, Protect Our Winters and the Natural Resources Defense Council found that the winter sports tourism industry generates $12.2 billion and 23 million Americans participate in winter sports annually. That study found that changes in the winter season driven by climate change were costing the downhill ski resort industry approximately $1.07 billion in aggregated revenue over high and low snow years over the last decade.

This analysis updates the 2012 study and furthers our understanding of how warming temperatures have impacted the industry since 2001, what the economic value of the industry is today (2015-2016) and what changes we can expect in the future under high and low emissions scenarios.

Taking another look at the changing winter sports tourism sector in America, we find:

  • The winter sports economy is important for the vitality of US mountain communities. This report shows the urgency for the US to deploy solutions to reduce emissions and presents a roadmap for the winter sports industry to take a leading role in advocating for solutions.

  • In the winter season of 2015–2016, more than 20 million people participated in downhill skiing, snowboarding, and snowmobiling, with a total of 52.8 million skiing and snowboarding days, and 11.6 million snowmobiling days.

  • These snowboarders, skiers and snowmobilers added an estimated $20.3 billion in economic value to the US economy, through spending at ski resorts, hotels, restaurants, bars, grocery stores, and gas stations.

  • We identify a strong positive relationship between skier visits and snow cover and/ or snow water equivalent. During high snow years, our analysis shows increased participation levels in snow sports result in more jobs and added economic value. In low snow years, participation drops, resulting in lost jobs and reduced revenue. The effects of low snow years impact the economy more dramatically than those of high snow years.

  • While skier visits averaged 55.4 million nationally between 2001 and 2016, skier visits during the five highest snow years were 3.8 million higher than the 2001-2016 average and skier visits were 5.5 million lower than average during the five lowest snow years.

  • Low snow years have negative impacts on the economy. We found that the increased skier participation levels in high snow years meant an extra $692.9 million in value added and 11,800 extra jobs compared to the 2001–2016 average. In low snow years, reduced participation decreased value added by over $1 billion and cost 17,400 jobs compared to an average season.

  • Climate change could impact consumer surplus associated with winter recreation, reducing ski visits and per day value perceived by skiers.

  • Ski resorts are improving their sustainability practices and their own emissions while also finding innovative ways to address low-snowfall and adapt their business models.

The winter sports economy is important for the vitality of US mountain communities. This report shows the urgency for the US to deploy solutions to reduce emissions and presents a roadmap for the winter sports industry to take a leading role in advocating for solutions.

A global game changer for energy efficiency investments

A new underwriting and risk assessment standard could help scale up this $1 trillion global market.

     

The energy reality behind Cape Town’s water crisis – and why the U.S. should care

Cape Town’s Day Zero has been making headlines worldwide, but nobody’s talking about the energy-water nexus or its role in the drought.